Tuesday Tip: How to Preserve Corn on the Cob

There’s more than corn in Indiana, but we do have a lot and it is delicious. In harvest, it is possible to get a dozen ears of corn for $2-3, and when you preserve it in your freezer, that can give a lot of savings throughout the year. Aside from the financial benefit, preserving fresh corn on the cob tastes so much better than store-bought bags of freezer corn! Try it out, even if you don’t live in Indiana. 🙂

~ Theresa

What you need:

frozen corn

Ingredients

  • Corn!

Equipment

  • cutting board and serrated knife
  • large stock pot(s)
  • baking sheets (optional – if you are preserving several ears of corn it can make the stacking easier)
  • quart bags or containers (plan accordingly – you don’t want to run out halfway through! see below for tips on how many you might need)

Time: 15 minutes prep, 8-12 minutes boiling, 15-30 minutes cooling, 15-30 minutes cutting and bagging (for one dozen, add time for more)

Freezeable: Yes!

Serves: You can divide your bags a few different ways as meets your needs:

  • By number of ears of corn: 1 quart bag can hold 3-5 ears of corn, depending on their size. As you cut the corn off the cob you can put it straight into the bag. The first year we did this we started with 3 ears of corn in a bag because that’s how much we thought we might need in one sitting.
  • By cups: You could measure the cut corn with a measuring cup so that you know exactly how many cups are in each bag. Sizes of ears of corn can vary, so this could be more precise.
  • By weight: You could weigh the cut corn on a kitchen scale as you add it to the bag so that it might more closely mirror store-bought bags of frozen corn (i.e.. 12 oz. or 16 oz.), particularly if you want to use them in recipes that call for a bag of frozen corn.

Multiplying the recipe: Do as many as you want! The only ingredient is corn! We do about 12 dozen ears of corn in the summer, yielding about 40-45 quart bags. That gives us almost a bag of corn a week, which works well for us! Find out what works for your family.

Preserving Corn on the Cob:

Start your largest pot(s) of water boiling. Shuck the corn, peeling back as much of the silks as possible. Don’t waste time on this step, though, as some of that will also come off in the water.

Work in shifts adding the corn to the pots. Cook them for 8-12 minutes, until bright yellow in color. Remove them to a cutting board or baking sheet to cool. Repeat this step until all of the corn is cooked.

Once the corn is cool enough to handle (don’t burn your hands!), hold the ear of corn vertically on the cutting board. Using a serrated knife, cut down the side to remove the kernels from the cob. They will typically come off in sheets. If you prefer the corn to be in individual kernels, they will easily break apart with your fingers before or after the freezing process. For speed and convenience, I would recommend leaving them in the “sheets of corn” until you either bag or cook it later.

Using your preferred method for dividing your freezer bags, put cut corn in the bags and remove as much air as possible before sealing. Flatten the bags for easier stacking in the freezer.

To cook, remove corn from the bag and place in a microwave safe dish with 2 T. water. Microwave on High for 3 minutes. Stir, and heat for an additional 2-3 minutes. You can also heat it on the stovetop until heated through.

frozen corn

 

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35 Responses to Tuesday Tip: How to Preserve Corn on the Cob

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